Amy Goodspeed

Season: 5, Episodes: 3, Faction: DHARMA Initiative

Overview

Amy Goodspeed was a member of the DHARMA Initiative on the Island in the 70’s and was the first member of the Initiative to meet the time travelling survivors. She was the wife of Horace Goodspeed and the mother of Ethan Rom. 

Sexuality (Love)

Childbirth

Fertility (Vegetation)

Fertility (Water)

Fertility (Earth)

1974

5×08 – LaFleur

   

Amy and her husband Paul were out on a picnic when they were ambushed by two Hostiles. They executed her husband, and were putting a bag over Amy’s head when Sawyer and Juliet intervened and killed both of the men. Amy told them they had to bury the two deceased Others and begged Sawyer to bring Paul’s body back home. On their way to the Barracks, Amy still didn’t completely trust the group of survivors. At the sonic fence, she covertly put earplugs into her ears and walked through, unaffected. Then she watched as Sawyer, Juliet, Jin, Daniel, and Miles walked through the activated pylons and fell to the ground in pain.

   

After a brief period of mourning over her husband, she agreed to give up Paul’s body in order to maintain the truce between the Hostiles and the DHARMA Initiative. Before she allowed him to be taken, she removed his necklace, which was a carved wooden hieroglyph called an Ankh. (“LaFleur”)

1977

5×08 – LaFleur

   

Amy became romantically involved with Horace, and was pregnant with his child. Although she was supposed to be transported to the mainland to give birth, she went into labor two weeks early. The delivery was complicated by the baby being in a breech presentation, requiring an emergency Cesarean section. With only an internist on the Island at the time, the C-section had to be performed by Juliet. Following delivery, the baby and Amy were said to be in good health. (“LaFleur”)

5×09 – Namaste

   

The next day, while napping, Juliet snuck up on Amy to try to obtain the sub manifest, so she could add the names of Jack, Kate, and Hurley. Amy awoke, and engaged in a short conversation with Juliet, where she said that she and Horace had decided on a name for their baby: Ethan. (“Namaste”)

5×10 – He’s Our You

   

When Horace held a meeting in order to decide what to do with Sayid (who was thought to be a Hostile infiltrator), Amy insisted that Sayid had to be killed, because she was “tired of sleeping with one eye open.” After she enjoined Horace to think about the safety of their childand of the other DHARMA children, Horace agreed to bring the matter up for a vote. Amy, along with everyone else present, voted for Sayid’s death. (“He’s Our You”)

1992

Amy was murdered during The Purge along with Horace by the Others, among whom was their son Ethan.

Images SourceSource 

Associated LOST Themes & DHARMA Location

      

Decoded Family Members

Horace Goodspeed (Husband)

Olivia Goodspeed (Sister-in-law)

Ethan Rom (Son)

Paul (Ex-Husband)

Decoded Season 1 & 3 Characters

James Sawyer

Jin-Soo Kwon

Juliet Burke

Decoded Season 4 & 5 Characters

Daniel Faraday

Miles Straume

Doctor

Fern

Tom

Stuart Radzinsky

Rosie

Key Episode(s) to Decoding the Character

5x08 "LaFleur"

5x09 "Namaste"

5x10 "He's Our You"









Wiki Info

Aphrodite is the Greek goddess of love, beauty, and sexuality. Her Roman equivalent is the goddess Venus. Historically, her cult in Greece was imported from, or influenced by, the cult of Astarte in Phoenicia.

According to Hesiod’s Theogony, she was born when Cronus cut off Uranus‘ genitals and threw them into the sea, and from the sea foam (aphros) arose Aphrodite.

Because of her beauty other gods feared that jealousy would interrupt the peace among them and lead to war, and so Zeus married her to Hephaestus, who was not viewed as a threat. Aphrodite had many lovers, both gods like Ares, and men like Anchises. Aphrodite also became instrumental in the Eros and Psyche legend, and later was both Adonis‘ lover and his surrogate mother. Many lesser beings were said to be children of Aphrodite.

Aphrodite is also known as Cytherea (Lady of Cythera) and Cypris (Lady of Cyprus) after the two cult-sites, Cythera and Cyprus, which claimed her birth. Myrtles, doves, sparrows, horses, and swans are sacred to her. The Greeks further identified the Ancient Egyptian goddess Hathor with Aphrodite. Aphrodite also has many other local names, such as Acidalia, Cytherea and Cerigo, used in specific areas of Greece. Each goddess demanded a slightly different cult but Greeks recognized in their overall similarities the one Aphrodite. Attic philosophers of the fourth century separated a celestial Aphrodite (Aprodite Urania) of transcendent principles with the common Aphrodite of the people (Aphrodite Pandemos).

Mythology

Birth

Aphrodite is usually said to have been born near Paphos, on the island of Cyprus, for which reason she is called “Cyprian”, especially in the poetic works of Sappho. Her chief center of worship was at Paphos, where the goddess of desire had been worshipped from the early Iron Age in the form of Ishtar and Astarte. However, other versions of her myth have her born near the island of Kythira (Cythera), for which reason she is called “Cytherea”. Kythira was a stopping place for trade and culture between Crete and the Peloponesus, so these stories may preserve traces of the migration of Aphrodite’s cult from the Middle East to mainland Greece.

In the most famous version of her myth, her birth was the consequence of a castration: Cronus severed Uranus’ genitals and threw them behind him into the sea. The foam from his genitals gave rise to Aphrodite (for which reason she is called “foam-arisen”), while the Erinyes (furies) emerged from the drops of blood. Hesiod states that the genitals “were carried over the sea a long time, and white foam arose from the immortal flesh; with it a girl grew.” This girl became Aphrodite. She floated ashore on a scallop shell. This image of a fully mature “Venus rising from the sea” (Venus Anadyomene) was one of the iconic representations of Aphrodite, made famous in a much-admired painting by Apelles, now lost, but described in the Natural History of Pliny the Elder.

In another version of her origin, she was considered a daughter of Zeus and Dione, the mother goddess whose oracle was at Dodona. Aphrodite herself was sometimes also referred to as “Dione.” “Dione” seems to be a feminine form of “Dios”, the genitive form case of Zeus, and could be taken to mean simply “the goddess” in a generic sense. Aphrodite might then be an equivalent of Rhea, the Earth Mother, whom Homer relocated to Olympus. Some scholars have hypothesized an original Proto-Indo-European pantheon, with the chief male god (Di-) represented by the sky and thunder, and the chief female god (feminine form of Di-) represented as the earth or fertile soil. After the worship of Zeus had displaced the oak-grove oracle at Dodona, some poets made Zeus the father of Aphrodite. In some tales, Aphrodite was a daughter of Zeus and Thalassa (the sea).

In Homer, Aphrodite, venturing into battle to protect her son, Aeneas, is wounded by Diomedes and returns to her mother, to sink down at her knee and be comforted.

Adulthood

Aphrodite had no childhood: in every image and each reference she is born as an adult, nubile, and infinitely desirable. Aphrodite is often depicted nude in many of the images she is in. Aphrodite, in many of the late anecdotal myths involving her, is characterized as vain, ill-tempered and easily offended. Though she is one of the few gods of the Greek Pantheon to be actually married, she is frequently unfaithful to her husband. Hephaestus is one of the most even-tempered of the Hellenic deities; in the narrative embedded in the Odyssey Aphrodite seems to prefer Ares, the volatile god of war, as she was attracted to his violent nature. She is one of a few characters who played a major part in the original cause of the Trojan War itself: not only did she offer Helen of Troy to Paris, but the abduction was accomplished when Paris, seeing Helen for the first time, was inflamed with desire to have her—which is Aphrodite’s realm.

Due to her immense beauty, Zeus was frightened that she would be the cause of violence between the other gods. He married her off to Hephaestus, the dour, humorless god of smithing. In another version of this story, Hera, Hephaestus’ mother, had cast him off Olympus; deeming him ugly and deformed. His revenge was to trap her in a magic throne, and then to demand Aphrodite’s hand in return for Hera’s release. Hephaestus was overjoyed at being married to the goddess of beauty and forged her beautiful jewelry, including the cestus, a girdle that made her even more irresistible to men. Her unhappiness with her marriage caused Aphrodite to seek out companionship from others, most frequently Ares, but also Adonis.

Adonis

Aphrodite was Adonis’ lover and a surrogate mother to him. Cinyras, the King of Cyprus, had an intoxicatingly beautiful daughter named Myrrha. When Myrrha’s mother commits Hubris against Aphrodite by claiming her daughter is more beautiful than the famed goddess, Myrrha is punished with a never ending lust for her own father. Cinyras is repulsed by this, but Myrrha disguises herself as a prostitute, and secretly sleeps with her father at night. Eventually, Myrrha becomes pregnant and is discovered by Cinyras. In a rage, he chases her out of the house with a knife. Myrrha flees from him, praying to the gods for mercy as she runs. The gods hear her plea, and change her into a Myrrh tree so her father cannot kill her. Eventually, Cinyras takes his own life in an attempt to restore the family’s honor.

Myrrha gives birth to a baby boy named Adonis. Aphrodite happens by the Myrrh tree and, seeing him, takes pity on the infant. She places Adonis in a box, and takes him down to Hades so that Persephone can care for him. Adonis grows into a strikingly handsome young man, and Aphrodite eventually returns for him. Persephone, however, is loath to give him up, and wishes Adonis would stay with her in the underworld. The two goddesses begin such a quarrel that Zeus is forced to intercede. He decrees that Adonis will spend a third of the year with Aphrodite, a third of the year with Persephone, and a third of the year with whomever he wishes. Adonis, of course, chooses Aphrodite.

Adonis begins his year on the earth with Aphrodite. One of his greatest passions is hunting, and although Aphrodite is not naturally a hunter, she takes up the sport just so she can be with Adonis. They spend every waking hour with one another, and Aphrodite is enraptured with him. However, her anxiety begins to grow over her neglected duties, and she is forced to leave him for a short time. Before she leaves, she gives Adonis one warning: do not attack an animal who shows no fear. Adonis agrees to her advice, but, secretly doubting her skills as a huntress, quickly forgets her warning.

Not long after Aphrodite leaves, Adonis comes across an enormous wild boar, much larger than any he has ever seen. It is suggested that the boar is the god Ares, one of Aphrodite’s lovers made jealous through her constant doting on Adonis. Although boars are dangerous and will charge a hunter if provoked, Adonis disregards Aphrodite’s warning and pursues the giant creature. Soon, however, Adonis is the one being pursued; he is no match for the giant boar. In the attack, Adonis is castrated by the boar, and dies from a loss of blood. Aphrodite rushes back to his side, but she is too late to save him and can only mourn over his body. Wherever Adonis’ blood falls, Aphrodite causes anemones to grow in his memory. She vows that on the anniversary of his death, every year there will be a festival held in his honor.

On his death, Adonis goes back to the underworld, and Persephone is delighted to see him again. Eventually, Aphrodite realizes that he is there, and rushes back to retrieve him. Again, she and Persephone bicker over who is allowed to keep Adonis until Zeus intervenes. This time, he says that Adonis must spend six months with Aphrodite and six months with Persephone, the way it should have been in the first place.

Other Tales

In one version of the story of Hippolytus, she was the catalyst for his death. He scorned the worship of Aphrodite for Artemis and, in revenge, Aphrodite caused his stepmother, Phaedra, to fall in love with him, knowing Hippolytus would reject her.

In the most popular version of the story, as told in the play Hippolytus by Euripides, Phaedra seeks revenge against Hippolytus by killing herself and, in her suicide note, telling Theseus, her husband and Hippolytus’ father, that Hippolytus had raped her. Hippolytus was oath-bound not to mention Phaedra’s love for him and nobly refused to defend himself despite the consequences. Theseus then cursed his son, a curse that Poseidon was bound to fulfill and so Hippolytus was laid low by a bull from the sea that caused his chariot-team to panic and wreck his vehicle. Hippolytus forgives his father before he dies and Artemis reveals the truth to Theseus before vowing to kill the one Aphrodite loves (Adonis) for revenge.

Glaucus of Corinth angered Aphrodite and she made her horses angry during the funeral games of King Pelias. They tore him apart. His ghost supposedly frightened horses during the Isthmian Games.

In one Greek myth, Aphrodite placed the curse of snakes for hair and the stone-gaze upon Medusa and her sisters. Aphrodite was jealous of the three sisters beauty, and she grew so jealous she cursed them.

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Erotes

The erotes are a group of winged gods and demi-gods from Classical mythology, associated with love and sex, and part of Aphrodite’s retinue. The collective term ἔρωτες – erotes is simply the plural of ἔρως – eros, or “desire”.

Stories of the erotes’ mischief or pranks were popular in Hellenistic culture. The figures were common motifs in classical art, often symbolizing various aspects of love. Other depictions include individual erotes as characters, particularly the offspring of Ares and Aphrodite: ErosAnterosHimeros and Pothos. The individual erotes are sometimes linked to particular aspects of love, such as unrequited love. In some traditions, erotes have an especial influence over homoerotic love.

General role and attributes

The erotes are a group of winged gods in Classical mythology. They are associated with love and sexual desire, and form part of Aphrodite’s retinue. The individual erotes are sometimes linked to particular aspects of love, and are often associated with same-sex desire. Sometimes the erotes are regarded as manifestations of a singular god, Eros.

Stories of the erotes’ mischief or pranks were a popular theme in Hellenistic culture, particularly in the 2nd century BCE. Spells to attract or repel erotes were used, in order to induce love or the opposite. Different erotes represented various facets of love or desire, such as unrequited love (Himeros), mutual love (Anteros) or longing (Pothos).

The erotes were usually portrayed as nude, handsome, winged youths. The earliest known sculptured friezes depicting a group of erotes and winged maidens driving chariots pulled by goats, were created to decorate theatres in ancient Greece in the 2nd century BCE. The representation of erotes in such friezes became common, including erotes in hunting scenes. Due to their role in the classical mythological pantheon, the erotes’ representation is sometimes purely symbolic (indicating some form of love) or they may be portrayed as individual characters. The presence of erotes in otherwise non-sexual images, such as of two women, has been interpreted to indicate a homoerotic subtext. In the cult of Aphrodite in Anatolia, iconographic images of the goddess with three erotes symbolized the three realms over which she had dominion: the Earth, sky, and water.

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Mythological Family Members & Associated Deities

URANUS (Father)

ADONIS (Consort)

HEPHAESTUS (Consort)

ARES (Consort)

EROS (Son)

POTHOS (Son)

ANTEROS (Son)

HIMEROS (Son)

CRONUS

ZEUS

ASTARTE

HATHOR

HADES

PERSEPHONE

RHEA

THALASSA

HERA

HIPPOLYTUS

ARTEMIS

THESEUS

POSEIDON

GLAUCUS

MEDUSA

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