Ticket Agent

Season: 2, Episodes: 1, Faction: N/A

Overview

The ticket agent tried unsuccessfully, to sell Kate a train ticket to Tallahassee.

Underworld

Punishment

Fertility (Vegetation)

Fertility (Earth)

Fertility (Water)

2×09 – What Kate Did

   

The transaction between Kate and the Ticket Agent never finished, due to U.S. Marshal Edward Mars’ arrest of Kate.

   

During Mars’ transfer of Kate to her arraignment in Iowa, a black horse passed in front of the car, which resulted in Mars swerving to avoid hitting the animal and smashing into a pole. After a brief struggle Kate kicked Mars out of the car and escaped in his vehicle, leaving Mars unconscious on the road. (“What Kate Did”)

Images SourceSource 

Related Character Images

   

   

Associated DHARMA Stations

Decoded Season 1 & 2 Characters

Kate Austen

Edward Mars

John Locke

Dr. Pierre Chang

Key Episode(s) to Decoding the Character

2x09 "What Kate Did"











Wiki Info

In Greek Mythology, Tantalus became one of the inhabitants of Tartarus, the deepest portion of the Underworld, reserved for the punishment of evildoers; there Odysseus saw him. The association of Tantalus with the underworld is underscored by the names of his mother Plouto (“riches”, as in gold and other mineral wealth), and grandmother, Chthonia (“earth”).

Tantalus was initially known for having been welcomed to Zeus’ table in Olympus, like Ixion. There he is said to have misbehaved and stolen ambrosia and nectar to bring it back to his people, and revealed the secrets of the gods.

Most famously, Tantalus offered up his son, Pelops, as sacrifice. He cut Pelops up, boiled him, and served him up in a banquet for the gods. The gods became aware of the gruesome nature of the menu, so they didn’t touch the offering; only Demeter, distraught by the loss of her daughter, Persephone, absentmindedly ate part of the boy’s shoulder. Clotho, one of the three Fates, ordered by Zeus, brought the boy to life again (she collected the parts of the body and boiled them in a sacred cauldron), rebuilding his shoulder with one wrought of ivory made by Hephaestus and presented by Demeter. The revived Pelops grew to be an extraordinarily handsome youth, so much so that the god Poseidon fell in love with him and abducted him to Mount Olympus. Later, Zeus threw Pelops out of Olympus due to his anger at Tantalus. The Greeks of classical times claimed to be horrified by Tantalus’s doings; cannibalism, human sacrifice and infanticide were atrocities and taboo.

Tantalus’s punishment for his act, now a proverbial term for temptation without satisfaction (the source of the English word tantalise), was to stand in a pool of water beneath a fruit tree with low branches. Whenever he reached for the fruit, the branches raised his intended meal from his grasp. Whenever he bent down to get a drink, the water receded before he could get any. Over his head towers a threatening stone like the one that Sisyphus is punished to roll up a hill. This fate has cursed him with eternal deprivation of nourishment.

In a different story, Tantalus was blamed for indirectly having stolen the dog made of gold created by Hephaestus (god of metals and smithing) for Rhea to watch over infant Zeus. Tantalus’s friend Pandareus stole the dog and gave it to Tantalus for safekeeping. When asked later by Pandareus to return the dog, Tantalus denied that he had the dog, saying he “had neither seen nor heard of a golden dog.” According to Robert Graves, this incident is why an enormous stone hangs over Tantalus’s head. Others state that it was Tantalus who stole the dog, and gave it to Pandareus for safekeeping.

But Tantalus was also the founder of the cursed House of Atreus in which variations on these atrocities continued. Misfortunes also occurred as a result of these acts, making the house the subject of many Greek Tragedies. Tantalus’s grave-sanctuary stood on Sipylus but honours were paid him at Argos, where local tradition claimed to possess his bones. In Lesbos, there was another hero-shrine in the small settlement of Polion and a mountain named after Tantalos.

Image & Source

Mythological Family Members & Associated Deities

ZEUS

HEPHAESTUS

ODYSSEUS

DEMETER

PERSEPHONE

POSEIDON

RHEA

SISYPHUS


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