Gerald DeGroot

Season: 2, Episodes: 1, Faction: DHARMA Initiative

Overview

Gerald DeGroot is the co-founder of the DHARMA Initiative, with his wife Karen DeGroot.

Leadership

War

Death

Before the DHARMA Initiative

Mysteries of the Universe

   

When Gerald was eight, Alvar Hanso stayed with his family while attending the University of Michigan (located in Ann Arbor, MI) as a foreign exchange student. Alvar bonded with the DeGroots, particularly Gerald, and stayed in contact with them over the years. Later, Gerald, and his future wife Karen, attended the University of Michigan as well, and were both doctoral candidates there. (Pearl Orientation video) When Gerald was a graduate student, he contacted Alvar, asking for funding for his new project, the DHARMA Initiative. (Mysteries of the Universe)

Founding the DHARMA Initiative 

2×03 – Orientation  |  2×21 – ?

   

In 1970, Gerald and Karen DeGroot founded the DHARMA Initiative. It was, and may still be, financially backed by Danish industrialist and munitions magnate Alvar Hanso and his Hanso Foundation. The alleged purpose of the Initiative was to create “a large-scale communal research compound where scientists and free-thinkers from around the globe could pursue research in meteorology, psychology, parapsychology, zoology, and electromagnetism.”

After the DHARMA Initiative

According to Thomas Mittlewerk, the DHARMA Initiative “failed”. The whereabouts of this couple are unknown today, but many theories have surfaced.

DeGroot (Name)

DeGroot, or De Groot, is a very common Dutch family name, meaning “the big” or “the great“.

Images SourceSource 

Associated DHARMA Stations & LOST Mythology

      

Decoded Family Members

Karen DeGroot (Wife)

Decoded Season 1 Characters

John Locke

Jack Shephard

Decoded Season 2 Characters

Alvar Hanso

Thomas Mittlewerk

Desmond Hume

Mr. Eko

Key Episode(s) to Decoding the Character

2x03 "Orientation"

2x21 "?"

Mysteries of the Universe









Wiki Info

Alexander III of Macedon (20/21 July 356 – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander the Great, was a Greeki[›] king of Macedon. He is the most celebrated member of the Argead Dynasty and the creator of one of the largest empires in ancient history.

Born in Pella in 356 BC, Alexander was tutored by the famed philosopher Aristotle. In 336 BC he succeeded his father Philip II of Macedon to the throne after he was assassinated. Philip had brought most of the city-states of mainland Greece under Macedonian hegemony, using both military and diplomatic means. Upon Philip’s death, Alexander inherited a strong kingdom and an experienced army. He succeeded in being awarded the generalship of Greece and, with his authority firmly established, launched the military plans for expansion left by his father. In 334 BC he invaded Persian-ruled Asia Minor and began a series of campaigns lasting ten years. Alexander broke the power of Persia in a series of decisive battles, most notably the battles of Issus and Gaugamela. Subsequently he overthrew the Persian king Darius III and conquered the entirety of the Persian Empire.ii[›] The Macedonian Empire now stretched from the Adriatic sea to the Indus river. Following his desire to reach the “ends of the world and the Great Outer Sea”, he invaded India in 326 BC, but was eventually forced to turn back by the near-mutiny of his troops.

Alexander died in Babylon in 323 BC, before realizing a series of planned campaigns that would have begun with an invasion of Arabia. In the years following Alexander’s death a series of civil wars tore his empire apart which resulted in the formation of a number of states ruled by the Diadochi – Alexander’s surviving generals. Although he is mostly remembered for his vast conquests, Alexander’s lasting legacy was not his reign, but the cultural diffusion his conquests engendered. Alexander’s settlement of Greek colonists and culture in the east resulted in a new Hellenistic culture, aspects of which were still evident in the traditions of the Byzantine Empire until the mid-15th century. Alexander became legendary as a classical hero in the mold of Achilles, and features prominently in the history and myth of Greek and non-Greek cultures. He became the measure against which generals, even to this day, compare themselves; military academies throughout the world still teach his tactical exploits.

Conquerer of Egypt

When Alexander destroyed Tyre, most of the towns on the route to Egypt quickly capitulated, with the exception of Gaza. The stronghold at Gaza was built on a hill and was heavily fortified. At the beginning of the Siege of Gaza, Alexander utilized the engines he had employed against Tyre. After three unsuccessful assaults, the stronghold was finally taken by force, but not before Alexander received a serious shoulder wound. When Gaza was taken, the male population was put to the sword and the women and children were sold into slavery.

Jerusalem, on the other hand, opened its gates in surrender, and according to Josephus, Alexander was shown the book of Daniel’s prophecy, presumably chapter 8, where a mighty Greek king would subdue and conquer the Persian Empire. Thereupon, Alexander spared Jerusalem and pushed south into Egypt.

Alexander advanced on Egypt in later 332 BC, where he was regarded as a liberator. He was pronounced the new “Master of the Universe” and son of the deity of Amun at the Oracle of Siwa Oasis in the Libyan desert. Henceforth, Alexander often referred to Zeus-Ammon as his true father, and subsequent currency depicted him adorned with ram horns as a symbol of his divinity. During his stay in Egypt, he founded Alexandria-by-Egypt, which would become the prosperous capital of the Ptolemaic kingdom after his death.

Image & Source

Mythological Family Members & Associated Deities

ZEUS

AMUN (Father)

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