Brother Martin

Season: 3, Episodes: 1, Faction: N/A

Overview

Brother Martin is a priest who worked with Brother Campbell and Desmond in the monastery.

War

Death

Fertility (Water)

3×17 – Catch-22

   

He announced the arrival of Derek to Desmond who was found waiting at the gates of the monastery. Derek suddenly attacked Desmond, apologised to Brother Campbell then left the monastery.

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Related Character Images

   

   

   

Decoded Season 1 & 2 Characters

Charlie Pace

Hurley Reyes

Jin-Soo Kwon

Desmond Hume

Decoded Season 3 Characters

Brother Campbell

Derek

Key Episode(s) to Decoding the Character

3x17 "Catch 22"









Wiki Info

In Greek mythology, Achilles was a Greek hero of the Trojan War, the central character and the greatest warrior of Homer’s Iliad.

Achilles was the most handsome of the heroes assembled against Troy.

Later legends (beginning with a poem by Statius in the 1st century AD) state that Achilles was invulnerable in all of his body except for his heel. As he died because of a small wound on his heel, the term “Achilles’ heel” has come to mean a person’s principal weakness.

In the Iliad

Homer’s Iliad is the most famous narrative of Achilles’ deeds in the Trojan War. The Homeric epic only covers a few weeks of the war, and does not narrate Achilles’ death. It begins with Achilles’ withdrawal from battle after he is dishonored by Agamemnon, the commander of the Achaean forces. Agamemnon had taken a woman named Chryseis as his slave. Her father Chryses, a priest of Apollo, begged Agamemnon to return her to him. Agamemnon refused and Apollo sent a plague amongst the Greeks. The prophet Calchas correctly determined the source of the troubles but would not speak unless Achilles vowed to protect him. Achilles did so and Calchas declared Chryseis must be returned to her father. Agamemnon consented, but then commanded that Achilles’ battle prize Briseis be brought to replace Chryseis. Angry at the dishonor (and as he says later, because he loved Briseis) and at the urging of Thetis, Achilles refused to fight or lead his troops alongside the other Greek forces. At this same time, burning with rage over Agamemnon’s theft, Achilles prayed to his mother Thetis to convince Zeus to help the Trojans gain ground in the war, so that he may regain his honor.

As the battle turned against the Greeks, thanks to the influence of Zeus, Nestor declared that the Trojans were winning because Agamemnon had angered Achilles, and urged the king to appease the warrior. Agamemnon agreed and sent Odysseus and two other chieftains, Ajax and Phoenix, to Achilles with the offer of the return of Briseis and other gifts. Achilles rejected all Agamemnon offered him, and simply urged the Greeks to sail home as he was planning to do.

The Trojans, led by Hector, subsequently pushed the Greek army back toward the beaches and assaulted the Greek ships. With the Greek forces on the verge of absolute destruction, Patroclus led the Myrmidons into battle wearing Achilles’ armor, though Achilles remained at his camp. Patroclus succeeded in pushing the Trojans back from the beaches, but was killed by Hector before he could lead a proper assault on the city of Troy.

After receiving the news of the death of Patroclus from Antilochus, the son of Nestor, Achilles grieved over his beloved companion’s death and held many funeral games in his honor. His mother Thetis came to comfort the distraught Achilles. She persuaded Hephaestus to make a new armor for him, in place of the armor that Patroclus had been wearing which was taken by Hector. The new armor included the Shield of Achilles, described in great detail by the poet.

Enraged over the death of Patroclus, Achilles ended his refusal to fight and took the field killing many men in his rage but always seeking out Hector. Achilles even engaged in battle with the river god Scamander who became angry that Achilles was choking his waters with all the men he killed. The god tried to drown Achilles but was stopped by Hera and Hephaestus. Zeus himself took note of Achilles’ rage and sent the gods to restrain him so that he would not go on to sack Troy itself, seeming to show that the unhindered rage of Achilles could defy fate itself as Troy was not meant to be destroyed yet. Finally Achilles found his prey. Achilles chased Hector around the wall of Troy three times before Athena, in the form of Hector’s favorite and dearest brother, Deiphobus, persuaded Hector to stop running and fight Achilles face to face. After Hector realized the trick, he knew the battle was inevitable. Wanting to go down fighting, he charged at Achilles with his only weapon, his sword, but missed. Accepting his fate, Hector begged Achilles –not to spare his life, but to treat his body with respect after killing him. Achilles told Hector it was hopeless to expect that of him, declaring that “my rage, my fury would drive me now to hack your flesh away and eat you raw – such agonies you have caused me”. Achilles then got his vengeance, killing Hector with a single blow to the neck and tying the Trojan’s body to his chariot, dragging it around the battlefield for twelve days.

With the assistance of the god Hermes, Hector’s father, Priam, went to Achilles’ tent to plead with Achilles to permit him to perform for Hector his funeral rites. The final passage in the Iliad is Hector’s funeral, after which the doom of Troy was just a matter of time.

Penthesilea

Achilles, after his temporary truce with Priam, fought and killed the Amazonian warrior queen Penthesilea, but later grieved over her death. At first, he was so distracted by her beauty, he did not fight as intensely as usual. Once he realized that his distraction was endangering his life, he refocused and killed her. As he grieved over the death of such a rare beauty, a notorious Greek jeerer by the name of Thersites laughed and mocked the great Achilles. Annoyed by his insensitivity and disrespect, Achilles punched him in the face and killed him instantly.

Memnon, and the fall of Achilles

Following the death of Patroclus, Achilles’ closest companion was Nestor’s son Antilochus. When Memnon, king of Ethiopia killed Antilochus, Achilles was once again drawn onto the battlefield to seek revenge. The fight between Achilles and Memnon over Antilochus echoes that of Achilles and Hector over Patroclus, except that Memnon (unlike Hector) was also the son of a goddess.

Many Homeric scholars argued that episode inspired many details in the Iliad’s description of the death of Patroclus and Achilles’ reaction to it. The episode then formed the basis of the cyclic epic Aethiopis, which was composed after the Iliad, possibly in the 7th century B.C. The Aethiopis is now lost, except for scattered fragments quoted by later authors.

As predicted by Hector with his dying breath, Achilles was thereafter killed by Paris with an arrow (to the heel according to Statius). In some versions, the god Apollo guided Paris’ arrow. Some retellings also state that Achilles was scaling the gates of Troy and was hit with a poisoned arrow.

Both versions conspicuously deny the killer any sort of valor owing to the common conception that Paris was a coward and not the man his brother Hector was, and Achilles remained undefeated on the battlefield. His bones were mingled with those of Patroclus, and funeral games were held. He was represented in the lost Trojan War epic of Arctinus of Miletus as living after his death in the island of Leuke at the mouth of the river Danube (see below). Another version of Achilles’ death is that he fell deeply in love with one of the Trojan princesses, Polyxena. Achilles asks Priam for Polyxena’s hand in marriage. Priam is willing because it would mean the end of the war and an alliance with the world’s greatest warrior. But while Priam is overseeing the private marriage of Polyxena and Achilles, Paris, who would have to give up Helen if Achilles married his sister, hides in the bushes and shoots Achilles with a divine arrow, killing him.

Achilles was cremated and his ashes buried in the same urn as those of Patroclus.

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Mythological Family Members & Associated Deities

ODYSSEUS

AJAX

PATROCLUS

HECTOR

APOLLO

HERMES

ZEUS

HEPHAESTUS

MEMNON

AGAMEMNON

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