Aaron Littleton

Season: 1-5, Episodes: 54, Faction: Survivors

Overview

Aaron Littleton (known to the world as Aaron Austen) was born on the Island, and was the son of Claire Littleton and Thomas; the grandson of Christian Shephard and Carole Littleton; half-nephew of Jack Shephard; and great-nephew of Lindsey. Before making a fatal mission to the Looking Glass, Charlie Pace acted like a father to Aaron, and passed on to him his family heirloom ring. Aaron was left behind by Claire in the jungle for unknown reasons when she followed his grandfather, and Aaron was passed through multiple survivors (Sawyer, Kate, Sun) until he made it to the freighter where he was then picked up by the helicopter. When the Oceanic Six made it to the mainland, Kate presented Aaron as her son to the public. For a few days, Jack read bedtime stories to Aaron, hoping to become a surrogate father before getting a message from Charlie that he wasn’t supposed to raise him. Kate then lived alone with him in California and was warned by visions of Claire, his real mother, not to take him back to the Island. Neither Charlie nor Claire used Aaron’s name when admonishing Jack and Kate. After 3 years of living with Kate, Aaron was handed over into the care of his maternal grandmother, Carole Littleton, Claire’s mother, until Claire returns to care for her son. Sometime later Aaron was reunited with both birth mother, Claire and adoptive mother, Kate.

War

Death

Sun (Fire)

Sky

Fertility (Water)

Fertility (Vegetation)

1×10 – Raised by Another

Aaron was the son of Claire and her ex-boyfriend Thomas. Thomas was initially enthusiastic about having a child with Claire but later panicked and left her, not wanting fatherhood. Aaron was supposed to be adopted by Arlene and Joseph Stewart in Sydney before Claire began to doubt her decision and ultimately had a change of heart. Meanwhile, Claire was told by Richard Malkin, a possibly fraudulent psychic, that danger surrounded her child. Richard spent months persuading her that Aaron cannot be raised by another. However, after she couldn’t sign the adoption papers, he claimed there was a couple in Los Angeles “perfect” for the baby, and insisted Claire catch Flight 815 to meet them – thus leading her onto Oceanic Flight 815. (“Raised by Another”)

On the Island (Days 41-44)

1×20 – Do No Harm

   

On November 1st 2004, while Jack was busy tending to Boone after the Nigerian plane accident, Claire went into labor outside the camp. Kate was told by Jack to deliver the child and she found Claire was reluctant to do so thinking herself to be alone in raising him and also thinking that he wouldn’t want her, given that she planned to put him up for adoption. Nonetheless, with the aid of Jin and Charlie, Kate delivered the newborn and Claire returned to camp with her son.

   

Aaron’s birth coincided with the death of Boone Carlyle (“Do No Harm”)

1×21 – The Greater Good

   

Claire’s new role as a mother began to wear her out as she didn’t want to sleep for fear that something would happen to him. Charlie, who gave the child the nickname “Turnip-head”, found that few things stopped him from crying. He soon, however, discovered Sawyer’s voice soothed the infant. (“The Greater Good”)

1×22 – Born to Run

   

Claire and Charlie’s relationship blossomed as they both cared for the unnamed newborn, whom Charlie claimed he would call Turnip-head until Claire named him. (“Born to Run”)

1×23 – Exodus, Part 1

   

When Danielle Rousseau came to camp to warn of an imminent attack by The Others, she noted that Claire had given birth to her son. (“Exodus, Part 1”)

1×24 – Exodus, Part 2

   

Upon returning later, she approached Claire and asked to hold the child. Not thinking it to be a good idea, Claire made up an excuse but she became alarmed when she saw scratched on Rousseau’s arm that she remembered from her time with the Others. Danielle stole the infant from Claire and fled into the jungle. Sayid and Charlie began a chase to find Rousseau after Charlie promised Claire that he’d find her son. During this time, Claire told Charlie to Get Aaron back indicating that she had finally named him. (“Exodus, Part 2”)

1×25 – Exodus, Part 3

   

They eventually found Rousseau who told them that she thought if she gave them Claire’s child, they would return Alex to her. She allowed Sayid and Charlie to return Aaron to his terrified mother. (“Exodus, Part 3”)

   

Rousseau was present at the Black Rock when Arzt accidentally blew himself up after mishandling the dynamite.

Days 44-69

2×02 – Adrift  |  2×04 – Everybody Hates Hugo

After being reunited with his mother, and with her bond with Charlie growing, the three became a sort of family, with Charlie acting as a father for the infant and he began to bond further with Aaron. (“Adrift”)  (“Everybody Hates Hugo”)

2×06 – Abandoned

   

However, after Shannon awoke Claire in the middle of the night, she took Aaron and went to see what was happening. Charlie caught up with her and scolded her, acting very paternal to the child, about waking Aaron and bringing him to a possibly dangerous situation which led to Claire apologizing to Charlie. Charlie’s role as a surrogate father to her son began to irritate Claire, especially as it made her maternal role seem belittled. She sought comfort in John Locke who helped her put Aaron down for a nap and offered her advice on child care. (“Abandoned”)

   

Later, Shannon was accidentally shot and killed by Ana Lucia (after Walt appeared) while in the jungle.

2×09 – What Kate Did  |  2×10 – The 23rd Psalm

   

After the tail section survivors joined the beach camp, Claire introduced herself to Mr. Eko and recalled that Charlie was in the possession of a Virgin Mary statue. Eko soon revealed that the statues contained heroin and Claire was shocked and hurt. After Charlie and Eko returned to the beach camp, Claire told him that she didn’t want him around her or her baby. Claire, and Aaron, began to associate more with Locke who imparted his wisdom onto her. (“What Kate Did”)  (“The 23rd Psalm”)  (“The Hunting Party”)

2×12 – Fire + Water

   

Separated from Claire and Aaron, Charlie began having dreams about Aaron being in danger because he had not yet been baptised. While dreaming, Charlie took Aaron from Claire’s tent in a bid to baptise him but he was found by Hurley and, despite trying to explain that it was a misunderstanding, Claire slapped him and took Aaron from him. Charlie’s desperation to ‘save’ both Aaron and his new family led him to start a fire just off camp, and while the survivors dealt with the blaze, Charlie took Aaron and tried to baptize him again. Claire returned and found Aaron gone and when Locke found Charlie, he tried to get him to hand Aaron over. Charlie commented “Aaron’s not your responsibility. Where were you when he was born? Where were you when he was taken? You’re not his father. You’re not his family.” Locke replied that Charlie wasn’t his father either and repeatedly punched him, handing Aaron back to Claire. The next day Claire went to Eko and asked him to baptize her and Aaron. (“Fire + Water”)

2×15 – Maternity Leave

Aaron became sick and developed a rash, at which point Rousseau told Claire that he was “infected” and Claire began to have flashbacks of when she was taken by the Others. She remembered Aaron being injected in utero with the CR 4-81516-23 42 vaccine. Despite Jack telling her that it was a common, non-threatening virus called Roseola, Claire began a determined search for what had happened to her during that time with Ethan and The Others. Along with Kate and Rousseau, Claire trekked to the Medical Station where she had been held. Claire did not find the vaccine she thought would be there, but she did find and take a blue bootie she had knitted in the nursery they had set up for Aaron. The next day, Aaron’s fever broke and he began to recover and Claire promised Aaron that they would always been together. (“Maternity Leave”)

2×22 – Three Minutes

   

After the pallet drop Charlie found a pneumatic injector and a set of vaccines and presented them to Claire and Aaron as he wanted to keep them safe, despite Claire still being cold towards him. However, at the funerals of Ana Lucia and Libby, Claire gripped Charlie’s hand signalling she had forgiven him. (“Three Minutes”)

2×23 – Live Together, Die Alone, Part 1

   

After Desmond arrived at the camp, he saw Claire using the vaccine on Aaron and told her it was a waste of time, based on his experience with it. After that Desmond turned the key in the Swan station, the sky turned purple and the station imploded. Claire covered Aaron’s ears and not her own.

2×24 – Live Together, Die Alone, Part 2

   

Following Desmond’s release of the discharge, the hatch door ricocheted to the beach camp and Bernard pushed the mother and son out of the way, saving their lives. The following night, Charlie and Claire shared a kiss, signalling the reunion of Aaron’s ‘family’ (“Live Together, Die Alone, Part 2”)

   

During Desmond’s flashback, after a brief struggle with Kelvin he was accidentally killed by smashing his head on the rocks.

Images SourceSource 

Continue Reading

      

Related Character Images

   

Decoded Family Members

Christian Shepherd (Grandfather)

Carole Littleton (Grandmother)

Lindsey Littleton (Great Aunt)

Claire Littleton (Mother)

Jack Shephard (Half-Uncle)

Kate Austen (Adoptive Mother)

Decoded Season 1 Characters

Charlie Pace

Sun-Hwa Kwon

Ethan Rom

Danielle Rousseau

Sayid Jarrah

Decoded Season 2 Characters

Mr. Eko

Ana Lucia Cortez

Libby Smith

Desmond Hume

Bernard Nadler

Decoded Season 3 Characters

Naomi Dorrit

Decoded Season 4 Characters

Martin Keamy

Omar

Mayhew

Redfern

Lacour

Kocol

Decoded Season 5 Characters

Cassidy Phillips

Clementine Phillips

Ji Yeon Kwon

Dan Norton

Key Episode(s) to Decoding the Character

4x04 "Eggtown"

4x10 "Something Nice Back Home"

4x13 "Theres No Place Like Home, Part 2"

5x04 "The Little Prince"









Maahes (also spelled Mihos, Miysis, Mios, Maihes, and Mahes) was an ancient Egyptian lion-headed god of war, whose name means “he who is true beside her”. He was seen as a lion prince, the son of the goddess Bast (goddess) in Lower Egypt and of Sekhmet in Upper Egypt and shared her natures. His father was told to be a human unaware of Bastet’s/Sekhemet’s intentions to conceive. Maahes was a deity associated with war and weather, and was considered the protector of matrilineality and of the high priests of Amun, as well as that of knives, lotuses, and devouring captives. His cult was centred in Taremu and Per-Bast.

Origin

He is first mentioned in the New Kingdom, and some Egyptologists have suggested that Maahes was of foreign origin; indeed there is some evidence that he may have been identical with the lion-god Apedemak worshipped in Nubia and Egypt’s Western Desert.

As a lion-god and patron, he was also considered the son of and of Bast, the feline war goddess and patron of Lower Egypt as well as Sekhmet, the lioness war goddess and patron of Upper Egypt. Since his cult was centred in Per-Bast (Bubastis in Greek) or in Taremu (Leontopolis in Greek), he was more known as the son of Bast. As he became a tutelary deity of Egypt, his father was said to be the chief male deity at the time – either Ptah, or Ra who had by this time already merged with Atum into Atum-Ra. In his role of son of Ra, Maahes fought the serpent Apep during Ra’s nightly voyage.

Considered to have powerful attributes, feline deities were associated with the pharaohs, and became patrons of Egypt. The male lion hieroglyphic was used in words such as “prince”, “mashead”, “strength”, and “power”.

He was also known as “the lion Egyptian headed god of war”.

Name

His name begins with the hieroglyphs for the male lion, although in isolation it also means (one who can) see in front. However, the first glyph also is part of the glyph for Ma’at, meaning truth and order and so it came to be that Maahes was considered to be the devourer of the guilty and protector of the innocent. Some of the titles of Maahes were Lord of Slaughter, Wielder of the Knife, and The Scarlet Lord. Maahes was rarely called by his name and came to be referred to, somewhat misleadingly, as “Lord of Slaughter.” The “Lord of Slaughter” terminology was adopted during the Persian and later Roman periods when foreign conquerors met with fierce resistance from Maahes chiefs and their supporters. Cambyses ill-fated army which intended to destroy the Maahes Caste and their High Priest of Amen, the Oracle at Siwa, vanished in the desert during a sudden sand storm. The Maahes were known as Lord of the Storm and Lord of the Powerful KA in reference to legends giving them powers to control the weather.

Depictions

He was pictured as a man with the head of a male lion, occasionally holding a knife and wearing the double crown of Egypt, or the atef crown. Sometimes Maahes was identified with Nefertem and was shown with a bouquet of lotuses near him, but he also was depicted as a lion devouring a captive.

Sacred animals

Tame lions were kept in a temple dedicated to Maahes in Taremu, where Bast/Sekhmet were worshipped, his temple was adjacent to that of Bast. The ancient Greek historian Aelian wrote: “In Egypt, they worship lions, and there is a city called after them. (…) The lions have temples and numerous spaces in which to roam; the flesh of oxen is supplied to them daily (…) and the lions eat to the accompaniment of song in the Egyptian language”, thus the Greek name of the city Leontopolis was derived.

Image SourceSource


Further Info

Other Names: Similar to the Furies of Greek mythology being called “The Kindly Ones,” Mahes was rarely referred to by name and was instead referred to as “The Lord of the Massacre.” His name is also found spelled “Maahes.”

Patron of: Punishment of those who violate Maat, the universal order.

Appearance: A man with the head of a young lion, often shown carrying a knife.

Description: Another feline deity, Mahes was the son of Bast and Ptah and may be an Egyptian assimilation of the Nubian lion-god Apedemak. When Maat was violated, the other gods would work to set it aright, but Mahes would be sent to punish the one who had committed the transgression. Interestingly enough, he encompassed his own opposite, and his name was invoked as a protection for the innocent.

Worship: Cult center at Leontopolis, also worshipped alongside Bast at Bubastis. The Greeks also worshipped him for a time, possibly aligning him with the Furies.

Source


Mihos (Son of Bastet)

(Mahes, Miysis) Mihos is depicted as a lion or lion-headed man, and when depicted as a lion, frequently holds a knife in his paws and sits in front of a clump of lotus flowers. In his fully leonine form Mihos may also be depicted mauling a captive enemy. Mihos, who is conceived as the son of Sekhmet or of Bast, appears frequently as a guardian on the jambs of temple doorways. In one such place, the accompanying inscription reads, “To be said by Mihos: I enter against them [i.e., entities or forces inimical to the temple’s function], my hands holding the knife, in this my name of Raging Lion,” (Zabkar, p. 56). A late period amulet bears an inscription in Greek to Mihos, who is referred to as “flashing and thundering God, Lord of darkness and of the winds, acting quickly; a God who listens, most glorious, lion-shaped, whose name is Mihos, Mihos, Harmios (Horus-Mihos), Osiris-Mihos, Re … the great God, light, fire and flame.” The references to Horus- and Osiris-Mihos may refer to the practice of keeping a sacred lion in honor of Mihos, who while living was Horus-Mihos and at death became Osiris-Mihos, since we know that at Leontopolis there was a “sacred tomb of the lions,” (ibid., p. 150 n. 99).

Further Info

Mihos was the lion god and son of Bastet called Miysis by the Greeks. His local roots were at Leontopolis (modern Tell el-Muqdam) in nome eleven of Lower Egypt in the Eastern Delta. Osorkon III of the 22nd Dynasty erected a temple to him at Bubastis, the town sacred to the god’s mother. Mihos’ name is also found in amuletic papyri of the late New Kingdom.

Source


Wiki Info

Maahes (also spelled Mihos, Miysis, Mios, Maihes, and Mahes) was an ancient Egyptian lion-headed god of war, whose name means “he who is true beside her”. He was seen as a lion prince, the son of the goddess Bast (goddess) in Lower Egypt and of Sekhmet in Upper Egypt and shared her natures. His father was told to be a human unaware of Bastet’s/Sekhemet’s intentions to conceive. Maahes was a deity associated with war and weather, and was considered the protector of matrilineality and of the high priests of Amun, as well as that of knives, lotuses, and devouring captives. His cult was centred in Taremu and Per-Bast.

Origin

He is first mentioned in the New Kingdom, and some Egyptologists have suggested that Maahes was of foreign origin; indeed there is some evidence that he may have been identical with the lion-god Apedemak worshipped in Nubia and Egypt’s Western Desert.

As a lion-god and patron, he was also considered the son of and of Bast, the feline war goddess and patron of Lower Egypt as well as Sekhmet, the lioness war goddess and patron of Upper Egypt. Since his cult was centred in Per-Bast (Bubastis in Greek) or in Taremu (Leontopolis in Greek), he was more known as the son of Bast. As he became a tutelary deity of Egypt, his father was said to be the chief male deity at the time – either Ptah, or Ra who had by this time already merged with Atum into Atum-Ra. In his role of son of Ra, Maahes fought the serpent Apep during Ra’s nightly voyage.

Considered to have powerful attributes, feline deities were associated with the pharaohs, and became patrons of Egypt. The male lion hieroglyphic was used in words such as “prince”, “mashead”, “strength”, and “power”.

He was also known as “the lion Egyptian headed god of war”.

Name

His name begins with the hieroglyphs for the male lion, although in isolation it also means (one who can) see in front. However, the first glyph also is part of the glyph for Ma’at, meaning truth and order and so it came to be that Maahes was considered to be the devourer of the guilty and protector of the innocent. Some of the titles of Maahes were Lord of Slaughter, Wielder of the Knife, and The Scarlet Lord. Maahes was rarely called by his name and came to be referred to, somewhat misleadingly, as “Lord of Slaughter.” The “Lord of Slaughter” terminology was adopted during the Persian and later Roman periods when foreign conquerors met with fierce resistance from Maahes chiefs and their supporters. Cambyses ill-fated army which intended to destroy the Maahes Caste and their High Priest of Amen, the Oracle at Siwa, vanished in the desert during a sudden sand storm. The Maahes were known as Lord of the Storm and Lord of the Powerful KA in reference to legends giving them powers to control the weather.

Depictions

He was pictured as a man with the head of a male lion, occasionally holding a knife and wearing the double crown of Egypt, or the atef crown. Sometimes Maahes was identified with Nefertem and was shown with a bouquet of lotuses near him, but he also was depicted as a lion devouring a captive.

Sacred animals

Tame lions were kept in a temple dedicated to Maahes in Taremu, where Bast/Sekhmet were worshipped, his temple was adjacent to that of Bast. The ancient Greek historian Aelian wrote: “In Egypt, they worship lions, and there is a city called after them. (…) The lions have temples and numerous spaces in which to roam; the flesh of oxen is supplied to them daily (…) and the lions eat to the accompaniment of song in the Egyptian language”, thus the Greek name of the city Leontopolis was derived.

Image SourceSource 

Mythological Family Members & Associated Deities

RA (Father)

BAST (Mother)

SEKHMET

PTAH

HORUS

OSIRIS

AMUN

APEDEMAK

NEFERTEM

MA'AT

APEP

Advertisements

%d bloggers like this: