Widmore’s Victim

Season: 4, Episodes: 1, Faction: The Others

Overview

Widmore’s victim was an Other first seen on Ben’s tape.

Punishment

Prophecy

Fertility (Water)

Fertility (Vegetation)

Sky

On the mainland 

4×06 – The Other Woman

   

He was filmed being led blindfolded out of a van by Widmore’s henchman, and then beaten by Charles Widmore.

On the Island 

   

Ben shows Locke a video tape of the man being beaten by Widmore. Ben stated that he was being beaten because he had “the misfortune to get caught.” It is unknown when the footage was made, and nothing more is known about the victim. (“The Other Woman”)

Images SourceSource

Related Character Images 

   

   

Decoded Season 1 & 2 Characters

Charles Widmore

Benjamin Linus

John Locke

Decoded Season 4 Characters

Harper Stanhope

Key Episode(s) to Decoding the Character

4x06 "The Other Woman"









Wiki Info

In Greek mythology, Phineas was a Phoenician King of Thrace. The name ‘Phineas’ or ‘Phineus’ may be associated with the ancient city of Phinea (or Phineopolis) on the Thracian Bosphorus.

Phineas, Husband of Cleopatra

The second (and much more famous) Phineas lived several generations later, although his genealogical connection to the first Phineas is unclear. This second Phineas features in the story of Jason and the Argonauts, and was married to Cleopatra, daughter of Boreas. Phineas and Cleopatra had two sons, named Plexippus and Pandion, who were mistreated by their stepmother, Idaea, who Phineas married after the death of Cleopatra. His residence was the city of Salmydessus on the Black Sea. This Phineas was said to be a son of Poseidon, or of Phoenix, and had the gift of prophecy. Zeus, angry that Phineas revealed too much of the plans of the gods, punished him by blinding him and setting him on an island with a buffet of food. However, he could eat none of it because the harpies (vicious winged women) stole the food out of his hands right before he could eat. This continued until the arrival of Jason and the Argonauts. They sent the winged heroes the Boreads after the harpies. They succeeded in driving the monsters away but did not kill them, as a request from Iris: Goddess of Rainbows who promised that Phineas would not be bothered by the harpies again. It is said that the Boreads were turned back by Iris at the Strophades. As thanks, Phineas told the Argonauts how to pass the Symplegades. He was betrayed by his wife’s son Jason who gave him the Golden Fleece. He was recognized as a traitor.

Image & Source 

Mythological Family Members & Associated Deities

POSEIDON (Father)

JASON

IRIS

ZEUS









Wiki Info

In Greek mythology, a harpy (“snatcher”) was one of the winged spirits best known for constantly stealing all food from Phineas. The literal meaning of the word seems to be “that which snatches” as it comes from the ancient Greek word harpazein (ἁρπάζειν), which means “to snatch”.

A harpy was the mother by the West Wind Zephyros of the horses of Achilles. In this context Jane Ellen Harrison adduced the notion in Virgil’s Georgics (iii.274) that mares became gravid by the wind alone, marvelous to say.

Hesiod calls them two “lovely-haired” creatures, perhaps euphemistically. Harpies as ugly winged bird-women, e.g. in Aeschylus’ The Eumenides (line 50) are a late development, due to a confusion with the Sirens. Roman and Byzantine writers detailed their ugliness.

Mythology

The harpies were sisters of Iris, daughters of Thaumas and Electra.

Phineas, a king of Thrace, had the gift of prophecy. Zeus, angry that Phineas revealed too much, punished him by blinding him and putting him on an island with a buffet of food which he could never eat. The harpies always arrived and stole the food out of his hands right before he could satisfy his hunger, and befouled the remains of his food. This continued until the arrival of Jason and the Argonauts. The Boreads, sons of Boreas, the North Wind, who also could fly, succeeded in driving off the harpies, but without killing any of them, following a request from Iris, who promised that Phineas would not be bothered by the harpies again, and “the dogs of great Zeus” returned to their “cave in Minoan Crete”. Thankful for their help, Phineas told the Argonauts how to pass the Symplegades. (Argonautica, book II; Ovid XIII, 710; Virgil III, 211, 245).

In this form they were agents of punishment who abducted people and tortured them on their way to Tartarus. They were vicious, cruel and violent. They lived on Strophades. They were usually seen as the personifications of the destructive nature of wind. The harpies in this tradition, now thought of as three sisters instead of the original two, were: Aello (“storm swift”), Celaeno (“the dark”) — also known as Podarge (“fleet-foot”) — and Ocypete (“the swift wing”).

Aeneas encountered harpies on the Strophades as they repeatedly made off with the feast the Trojans were setting. Celaeno cursed them, saying the Trojans will be so hungry they will eat their tables before they reach the end of their journey. The Trojans fled in fear.

Harpies remained vivid in the Middle Ages. In his Inferno, XIII, Dante envisages the tortured wood infested with harpies, where the suicides have their punishment in the second ring.

Image & Source

 

Mythological Family Members & Associated Deities

HARPY

ZEPHYRUS (Lover)

IRIS (Sister)

ZEUS

ACHILLES

JASON

THAUMAS

BOREAS

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