The Bedouins

Bedouin #1 (Red)

Season: 4, Episodes: 1, Faction: N/A

Overview

The Bedouins were two Arab men encountered by Benjamin Linus after he woke up disoriented in the Sahara Desert (Tunisia).

War

Underworld

Death

Fertility (Vegetation)

Sky

4×09 – The Shape of Things to Come

   

The two Bedouins arrived on horseback, armed with AK-47s. They did not speak English, so Ben tried to communicate using Arabic and Turkish. The one wearing the gray keffiyeh patted Ben down and felt something hard in Ben’s right pocket. The object was a telescopic baton, which Ben used to beat the one, commandeer his rifle, and shoot the other (the one with the red keffiyeh). The beaten one (the one with the gray keffiyeh) said “Surrender”, and Ben retorted, “So you do speak English.” Ben then knocked him unconscious with the butt of the rifle and rode off on his horse.

   

Their Arabic conversation in English 

Bedouin #2: Look! There are no footprints around him.

(They look around to see if there are any footprints.)

Bedouin #1: From where did he come? Did he fall from the sky?

Images Source | Source 









Wiki Info

In Greek mythology, Sinis was a bandit killed by Theseus. Described as a giant, Sinis was a son of Poseidon, nicknamed “pinebender”. Sinis would force travelers to help him bend pine trees to the ground and then unexpectedly let go, catapulting the victim through the air. Some say he tied people to two pine trees that he bent down to the ground, then let the trees go, tearing his victims apart. This led to him being called Pityocamptes (Πιτυοκάμπτης = “pine-bender”). During The Labors of Theseus, he traveled from Troezen to Athens, and in his second deed Theseus killed Sinis in the same way. Theseus then raped Sinis’ daughter, Perigune, who later bore Theseus’ son, Melanippus. She later married Deioneus of Oechalia. According to Pausanias Sini’s pine was still alive and known during his times.

Image & Source

Mythological Family Members & Associated Deities

POSEIDON (Father)

THESEUS




Bedouin #2 (Gray)

Overview

The Bedouins were two Arab men encountered by Benjamin Linus after he woke up disoriented in the Sahara Desert (Tunisia).

War

Underworld

Death

Fertility (Vegetation)

Fertility (Earth)

4×09 – The Shape of Things to Come

   

The two Bedouins arrived on horseback, armed with AK-47s. They did not speak English, so Ben tried to communicate using Arabic and Turkish.

   

The one wearing the gray keffiyeh patted Ben down and felt something hard in Ben’s right pocket. The object was a telescopic baton, which Ben used to beat the one, commandeer his rifle, and shoot the other (the one with the red keffiyeh).

   

The beaten one (the one with the gray keffiyeh) said “Surrender”, and Ben retorted, “So you do speak English.” Ben then knocked him unconscious with the butt of the rifle and rode off on his horse.

Their Arabic conversation in English

Bedouin #2: Look! There are no footprints around him.

(They look around to see if there are any footprints.)

Bedouin #1: From where did he come? Did he fall from the sky?

Images Source | Source 

Related Character Images 

   

   

“Halliwax” (Parka Nametag)

Pierre Chang used a number of aliases during the various DHARMA Station orientation films. For the Orchid’s orientation film he used the alias “Dr. Edgar Halliwax”

“4”E (Apartment Number)

When Ben visited Widmore at his building he was stopped by the Doorman. Ben told him he was expected at apartment 4E.

#4 (John Locke’s Candidate Number)

Each potential candidate for Jacob’s replacement was assigned a number, John Locke was assigned the number 4. Before surrendering to the Mercenaries at the Orchid Station Ben gave Locke his telescopic baton to hold onto. He took back the baton from Locke before he moved the Island and was reincarnated back into the “real world”.

Osiris (John Locke) was the Ancient Egyptian ‘God of the Underworld’

Decoded Season 1 & 2 Characters

John Locke

Benjamin Linus

Charles Widmore

Dr. Pierre Chang

Decoded Season 4 Characters

London Doorman

Key Episode(s) to Decoding the Character

4x09 "The Shape Of Things To Come"












Wiki Info

The most prominent Periphetes, also known as Corynetes or the Club-Bearer, was a son of Hephaestus and Anticleia. Like his father, he was lame in one leg with only one eye as a Cyclopes would have. He roamed the road from Athens to Troezen where he robbed travellers and killed them with his bronze club. Theseus killed him by throwing a boulder at him and afterwards used the club as his own weapon.

Image Source | Image SourceSource

Mythological Family Members & Associated Deities

HEPHAESTUS (Father)

THESEUS




Interconnected Character


Wiki Info

Theseus was the mythical founder-king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, both of whom Aethra had slept with in one night. Theseus was a founder-hero, like Perseus, Cadmus, or Heracles, all of whom battled and overcame foes that were identified with an archaic religious and social order. As Hercules was the Dorian hero, Theseus was the Athenian founding hero, considered by them as their own great reformer: his name comes from the same root as θεσμός (“thesmos”), Greek for institution. He was responsible for the synoikismos (“dwelling together”)—the political unification of Attica under Athens, represented emblematically in his journey of labours, subduing highly localized ogres and monstrous beasts. Because he was the unifying king, Theseus built and occupied a palace on the fortress of the Acropolis that may have been similar to the palace that was excavated in Mycenae. Pausanias reports that after the synoikismos, Theseus established a cult of Aphrodite Pandemos (“Aphrodite of all the People”) and Peitho on the southern slope of the Acropolis.

In The Frogs, Aristophanes credited him with inventing many everyday Athenian traditions. If the theory of a Minoan hegemony is correct, he may have been based on Athens’ liberation from this political order rather than on an historical individual.

Plutarch’s vita of Theseus makes use of varying accounts of the death of the Minotaur, Theseus’ escape and the love of Ariadne for Theseus, in order to construct a literalistic biography, a vita. Plutarch’s sources, not all of whose texts have survived independently, included Pherecydes (mid-sixth century BC), Demon (ca 300 BC), Philochorus and Cleidemus (both fourth century BC).

Early Years

Aegeus, one of the primordial kings of Athens, found a bride, Aethra who was the daughter of king Pittheus at Troezen, a small city southwest of Athens. On their wedding night, Aethra waded through the sea to the island Sphairia that rests close to the coast and lay there with Poseidon (god of the sea and earthquakes). By the understanding of sex in antiquity, the mix of semen gave Theseus a combination of divine as well as mortal characteristics in his nature; such double fathers one father immortal, one mortal, was a familiar feature of Greek heroes. When Aethra became pregnant, Aegeus decided to return to Athens. But before leaving, he buried his sandals and sword under a huge rock and told her that when their son grew up, he should move the rock, if he were hero enough, and take the tokens for himself as evidence of his royal parentage. At Athens, Aegeus was joined by Medea, who had fled Corinth after slaughtering the children she had borne Jason, and had taken up a new consort in Aegeus. Priestess and consort together represented the old order at Athens.

Thus Theseus was raised in the land of his mother. When Theseus grew up and became a brave young man, he moved the rock and recovered his father’s arms. His mother then told him the truth about his father’s identity and that he must take the weapons back to the king and claim his birthright. To get to Athens, Theseus could choose to go by sea (which was the safe way) or by land, following a dangerous path around the Saronic Gulf, where he would encounter a string of six entrances to the Underworld, each guarded by a chthonic enemy. Young, brave and ambitious, Theseus decided to go alone by the land route, and defeated a great many bandits along the way.

The Six Entrances of the Underworld

  • At the first site, which was Epidaurus, sacred to Apollo and the healer Asclepius, Theseus turned the tables on the chthonic bandit, the “clubber” Periphetes, who beat his opponents into the Earth, and took from him the stout staff that often identifies Theseus in vase-paintings. At the time, Theseus was called the Mother Dog for many reasons.
  • At the Isthmian entrance to the Underworld was a robber named Sinis often called “Pityokamptes” (“he who bends Pinetrees”). He would capture travellers, tie them between two pine trees which were bent down to the ground, and then let the trees go, tearing his victims apart. Theseus killed him by his own method. He then raped Sinis’s daughter, Perigune, fathering the child Melanippus.
  • In another deed north of the Isthmus, at a place called Crommyon, he killed an enormous pig, the Crommyonian sow, bred by an old crone named Phaea. Some versions name the sow herself as Phaea. Apollodorus described the Crommyonian sow as an offspring of Typhon and Echidna.
  • Near Megara an elderly robber named Sciron forced travellers along the narrow cliff-face pathway to wash his feet. While they knelt, he kicked them off the cliff behind them, where they were eaten by a sea monster (or, in some versions, a giant turtle). Theseus pushed him off the cliff.
  • Another of these enemies was Cercyon, king at the holy site of Eleusis, who challenged passers-by to a wrestling match and, when he had beaten them, killed them. Theseus beat Cercyon at wrestling and then killed him instead. In interpretations of the story that follow the formulas of Frazer’s The Golden Bough, Cercyon was a “year-King”, who was required to do an annual battle for his life, for the good of his kingdom, and was succeeded by the victor. Theseus overturned this archaic religious rite by refusing to be sacrificed.
  • The last bandit was Procrustes, the Stretcher, who had two beds, one of which he offered to passers-by in the plain of Eleusis. He then made them fit into it, either by stretching them or by cutting off their feet. Since he had two beds of different lengths, no one would fit. Theseus turned the tables on Procrustes, cutting off his legs and decapitating him with his own axe.

Each of these sites was a very sacred place already of great antiquity when the deeds of Theseus were first attested in painted ceramics, which predate the literary texts.

Image & Source


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