Laurence

Season: 1 , Episodes: 1, Faction: N/A

Overview

Laurence sold Sawyer the .357 magnum revolver he used to kill Frank Duckett.

Fertility (Water)

Fertility (Vegetation)

War

Death

Sports (Athletic)

1×16 – Outlaws

   

His shop, located in a harbor in Sydney, Australia, was the scene of the transfer of the firearm.

   

He apparently had a career in metal work. He knew Hibbs and he had worked with him in the past. (“Outlaws”)

Images SourceSource

Related Character Images   

   

   

Decoded Season 1 Characters

James Sawyer

Hibbs

Frank Duckett

Bartender

Warren Ford

Hurley Reyes

Charlie Pace

Key Episode(s) to Decoding the Character

1x16 "Outlaws"











Wiki Info

Phocus was the son of Aeacus and Psamathe in Greek mythology. His mother, the Nereid goddess of sand beaches, transformed herself into a seal when she was ambushed by Aeacus, and was raped as a seal; conceived in the rape, Phocus’ name means “seal”. He had two sons, Crisus and Panopaeus.

Aeacus favored Phocus over Peleus and Telamon, his two sons with Endeïs. Apollodorus portrays Phocus as a strong athlete, whose athletic ability causes his half-brothers to grow jealous. Their jealousy drives them to murder him during sport practice; Telamon, the stronger half-brother, throws a discus at Phocus’ head, killing him. The brothers hide the corpse in a thicket, but Aeacus discovers the body and punishes Peleus and Telamon by exiling them from Aegina. Telamon is sent to Salamis, where he becomes king after Cychreus, the reigning king, dies without an heir, while Peleus goes to Phthia, where he is purified by the Phthian King Eurythion.

However, the tradition varies with regards to the nature of Phocus’ death. Other myths use the following as a means to describe Phocus’ death:

  1. Telamon threw a quoit at his head.
  2. Telamon killed him with a spear while hunting.
  3. Peleus killed him to please Endeis.
  4. Other sources say that whichever brother was responsible, it was an accident.

Source

Mythological Family Members & Associated Deities

PELEUS (Half-Brother)

TELAMON (Half-Brother)

EURYTION




Wiki Info

The Calydonian Boar is one of the monsters of Greek mythology that had to be overcome by heroes of the Olympian age. Sent by Artemis to ravage the region of Calydon in Aetolia because its king failed to honor her in his rites to the gods, it was killed in the Calydonian Hunt, in which many male heroes took part, but also a powerful woman, Atalanta, who won its hide by first wounding it with an arrow. This outraged some of the men, with tragic results. Strabo was under the impression that the Calydonian Boar was an offspring of the Crommyonian Sow vanquished by Theseus.

Importance in Greek mythology and art

The Calydonian Boar is one of the chthonic monsters in Greek mythology, each set in a specific locale. Sent by Artemis to ravage the region of Calydon in Aetolia, it met its end in the Calydonian Hunt, in which all the heroes of the new age pressed to take part, with the exception of Heracles, who vanquished his own Goddess-sent Erymanthian Boar separately. Since the mythic event drew together numerous heroes—among whom were many who were venerated as progenitors of their local ruling houses among tribal groups of Hellenes into Classical times—the Calydonian Boar hunt offered a natural subject in classical art, for it was redolent with the web of myth that gathered around its protagonists on other occasions, around their half-divine descent and their offspring. Like the quest for the Golden Fleece (Argonautica) or the Trojan War that took place the following generation, the Calydonian Hunt is one of the nodes in which much Greek myth comes together.

Both Homer and Hesiod and their listeners were aware of the details of this myth, but no surviving complete account exists: some papyrus fragments found at Oxyrhynchus are all that survive of Stesichorus’ telling; the myth repertory called Bibliotheke (“The Library”) contains the gist of the tale, and before that was compiled the Roman poet Ovid told the story in some colorful detail in his Metamorphoses.

Hunt

King Oeneus (“wine man”) of Calydon, an ancient city of west-central Greece north of the Gulf of Patras, held annual harvest sacrifices to the gods on the sacred hill. One year the king forgot to include Great “Artemis of the Golden Throne” in his offerings Insulted, Artemis, the “Lady of the Bow”, loosed the biggest, most ferocious boar imaginable on the countryside of Calydon. It rampaged throughout the countryside, destroying vineyards and crops, forcing people to take refuge inside the city walls (Ovid), where they began to starve.

Oeneus sent messengers out to look for the best hunters in Greece, offering them the boar’s pelt and tusks as a prize.

Among those who responded were some of the Argonauts, Oeneus’ own son Meleager, and, remarkably for the Hunt’s eventual success, one woman— the huntress Atalanta, the “indomitable”, who had been suckled by Artemis as a she-bear and raised as a huntress, a proxy for Artemis herself (Kerenyi; Ruck and Staples). Artemis appears to have been divided in her motives, for it was also said that she had sent the young huntress because she knew her presence would be a source of division, and so it was: many of the men, led by Kepheus and Ankaios, refused to hunt alongside a woman. It was the smitten Meleager who convinced them. Nonetheless it was Atalanta who first succeeded in wounding the boar with an arrow, although Meleager finished it off, and offered the prize to Atalanta, who had drawn first blood. But the sons of Thestios, who considered it disgraceful that a woman should get the trophy where men were involved, took the skin from her, saying that it was properly theirs by right of birth, if Meleagros chose not to accept it. Outraged by this, Meleagros slew the sons of Thestios and again gave the skin to Atalanta (Bibliotheke). Meleager’s mother, sister of Meleager’s slain uncles, took the fatal brand from the chest where she had kept it (see Meleager) and threw it once more on the fire; as it was consumed, Meleager died on the spot, as the Fates had foretold. Thus Artemis achieved her revenge against King Oeneus.

During the hunt, Peleus accidentally killed his host Eurytion. In the course of the hunt and its aftermath, many of the hunters turned upon one another, contesting the spoils, and so the Goddess continued to be revenged (Kerenyi, 114): “But the goddess again made a great stir of anger and crying battle, over the head of the boar and the bristling boar’s hide, between Kouretes and the high-hearted Aitolians” (Homer, Iliad, ix.543).

The boar’s hide that was preserved in the Temple of Athena Alae at Tegea in Laconia was reputedly that of the Calydonian Boar, “rotted by age and by now altogether without bristles” by the time Pausanias saw it in the second century CE. He noted that the tusks had been taken to Rome as booty from the defeated allies of Mark Anthony by Augustus; “one of the tusks of the Calydonian boar has been broken”, Pausanias reports, “but the remaining one, having a circumference of about half a fathom, was dedicated in the Emperor’s gardens, in a shrine of Dionysos“. The Calydonian Hunt was the theme of the temple’s main pediment.

Image & Source

Mythological Family Members & Associated Deities

ARTEMIS

HERACLES

THESEUS

MELEAGER

ATALANTA

PELEUS

EURYTION

ATHENA

DIONYSUS

ASCLEPIUS

IOLAUS

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