Brian Porter

Season: 1, Episodes: 1, Faction: N/A

Overview

Brian Porter was Susan’s boss, who was living and working as an attorney in Amsterdam in the Netherlands.

Sky (Wind)

Snow

Fertility (Water)

Death

1×14 – Special

   

Brian married Susan after her relationship with Michael ended. He and Susan attempted to adopt Walt (eventually successfully), which resulted in a legal struggle with Michael who was unwilling to give up his parental rights.

   

Brian surrendered custody of Walt to Michael after Susan died. He claimed that “things happen” when Walt is around and that Walt is “different somehow.”

   

He arranged for Walt and Michael to be on Flight 815. Michael also claimed that Brian allowed Walt to keep Vincent, though he was likely lying. (“Special”)

Image Source | Source 

Related Character Images 

   

   

   

Decoded Family Members & Lovers

Susan Lloyd (Wife)

Walt Lloyd (Stepson)

Vincent (Ex-Pet)

Decoded Season 1 Characters

Michael Dawson

Dagne

Nurse

Key Episode(s) to Decoding the Character

1x14 "Special"

 











Wiki Info

Boreas was the Greek god of the cold north wind and the bringer of winter. His name meant “North Wind” or “Devouring One”. Boreas is depicted as being very strong, with a violent temper to match. He was frequently shown as a winged old man with shaggy hair and beard, holding a conch shell and wearing a billowing cloak. Pausanias wrote that Boreas had snakes instead of feet, though in art he was usually depicted with winged human feet.

Boreas was closely associated with horses. He was said to have fathered twelve colts after taking the form of a stallion, to the mares of Erichthonius, king of Troy. These were said to be able to run across a field of grain without trampling the plants. Pliny (Natural History iv.35 and viii.67) thought that mares might stand with their hindquarters to the North Wind, and bear foals without a stallion. The Greeks believed that his home was in Thrace, and Herodotus and Pliny both describe a northern land known as Hyperborea (“Beyond the North Wind”), where people lived in complete happiness and had extraordinarily long lifespans.

Boreas was also said to have kidnapped Oreithyia, an Athenian princess, from the river Ilissus. Boreas had taken a fancy to Oreithyia, and had initially pleaded for her favours, hoping to persuade her. When this failed, he reverted to his usual temper and abducted her as she danced on the banks of the Ilissus. Boreas wrapped Oreithyia up in a cloud, raped her, and with her, Boreas fathered two sons—the Boreads, Zethes and Calais—and two daughters— Chione, goddess of snow, and Cleopatra.

From then on, the Athenians saw Boreas as a relative by marriage. When Athens was threatened by Xerxes, the people prayed to Boreas, who was said to have then caused winds to sink 400 Persian ships. A similar event had occurred twelve years earlier, and Herodotus writes:

Now I cannot say if this was really why the Persians were caught at anchor by the stormwind, but the Athenians are quite positive that, just as Boreas helped them before, so Boreas was responsible for what happened on this occasion also. And when they went home they built the god a shrine by the River Illisus.

The abduction of Oreithyia was popular in Athens before and after the Persian War, and was frequently depicted on vase paintings. In these paintings, Boreas was portrayed as a bearded man in a tunic, with shaggy hair that is sometimes frosted and spiked. The abduction was also dramatized in Aeschylus’s lost play Oreithyia.

In late accounts, Boreas was the father of Lycurgus (from different women that he had sex with) and the lover of the nymph Pitys.

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ANEMOI (Greek Wind Gods)

In Greek mythology, the Anemoi (“winds”) were Greek wind gods who were each ascribed a cardinal direction from which their respective winds came (see Classical compass winds), and were each associated with various seasons and weather conditions. They were sometimes represented as mere gusts of wind, at other times were personified as winged men, and at still other times were depicted as horses kept in the stables of the storm god Aeolus, who provided Odysseus with the Anemoi in the Odyssey. Astraeus, the astrological deity sometimes associated with Aeolus, and Eos, the goddess of the dawn, were the parents of the Anemoi, according to the Greek poet Hesiod.

The four chief Anemoi

  • Boreas was the north wind and bringer of cold winter air
  • Notus was the south wind and bringer of the storms of late summer and autumn
  • Zephyrus was the west wind and bringer of light spring and early summer breezes
  • Eurus was the east wind, and was not associated with any of the three Greek seasons, and is the only one of these four Anemoi not mentioned in Hesiod’s Theogony or in the Orphic Hymns.

Anemoi Thuellai (“Tempest-Winds”)

Four lesser wind deities appear in a few ancient sources, such as at the Tower of the Winds in Athens. Originally, as attested in Hesiod and Homer, these four minor Anemoi were the Anemoi Thuellai (“Tempest-Winds”), wicked and violent daemons (spirits) created by the monster Typhon, and male counterparts to the harpies, who were also called thuellai. These were the winds held in Aeolus’s stables; the other four, “heavenly” Anemoi were not kept locked up. However, later writers confused and conflated the two groups of Anemoi, and the distinction was largely forgotten.

Minor Winds

The four lesser Anemoi were sometimes referenced and represent:

The deities equivalent to the Anemoi in Roman mythology were the Venti (in Latin, “winds”). These gods had different names, but were otherwise very similar to their Greek counterparts, borrowing their attributes and being frequently conflated with them.

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Mythological Family Members & Associated Deities

ASTRAEUS (Father)

ZEPHYRUS (Brother)

EURUS (Brother)

NOTUS (Brother)

ORITHYIA (Lover)

CHIONE (Daughter)

ERICHTHONIUS

APELIOTES

LIPS

SKEIRON

KAIKIAS

AEOLUS

TYPHON

ODYSSEUS

EOS


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